Four Stars For Kayode Adebiyi’s ‘Entangled’

By Gideon Olomofe

Ajoke has forcefully divorced Dr. Femi Cole because of the repeated hurts she had suffered from him in several cases of extramarital affairs he engaged himself in.

Now a fervent Christian and having learned from how she had engaged in romantic relationships in her university days, which made her end up managing marriage with a world-best cheater like Dr. Femi, she does all she can to inculcate discipline in her only daughter, Kikelomo, so that she does not tread the routes relating to her past.

However, Kikelomo, who has been heeding her mother’s instruction with fear and trembling and with her natural toughness for men, gets to the National Youth Service and finds Deji as the love of her life; they’ve promised to marry each other and have been envisioning beautiful future ahead of them. But Ajoke must not hear this because she would insist that time has not yet ripe for her to engage in such.

How would Kikelomo protect her newly found love life, which happens to get intense day by day, in the face of her mother’s rigid doctrines?

One problem entangles the other, as we would later discover that Ajoke’s record of the past, which is characterized by romantic messes, would be exposed to the world, and Kikelomo may never forgive her mother for being too hard on her while she hides such a dirty youthful past.

Entangled by Kayode Adebiyi is a realistic fiction novel that features youthful mistakes in romantic relationships, family problems, love and affection sharing, and the role of the spiritual fathers in societies.

The story has a lot of lessons to teach every youth, young adult, and older adult. This is because the story tells the major and usual ominous student life that today’s Nigerian youths live, the consequential problematic issues they face as couples, and the usual way the Christianity ones would go about looking for remedies.

The lessons that could be gained tend to be practicable because the happenings in every scene are realistic, such that I can say the author has left no stone unturned in doing justice to the conflict and resolution of the plot. The story teaches the moral of self-control for prospective new couples and the danger of lacking the same in romantic relationships. The former is exemplified in the couple’s life of Deji and Kikelomo, and the latter is exemplified in the naive student life of Ajoke, Kikelomo’s mother, during her university days.

When Deji and Kikelomo newly found themselves and their love gets more intense, I appreciate how the two show sincere love, which has distinguished true love from lust; youths having marriage in view could learn the definition of true love from these lovers.

The danger of lacking self-control and its ever-burning consequences can be learned from Ajoke, as she finds herself indecisive about whom to hold between Femi and Ola. Her lack of self-control and indecisiveness caused her to unknowingly end up carrying Ola’s child into her marriage with Femi, which later formed the climax of her problem.

I appreciate the intelligent effort of Adebiyi in this great piece. His description of the environment and characters’ actions shows me the story visually. This makes me stick to the book each time I carry it to read. Sincerely, I had a great time reading the book, and I can not love it less.

Additionally, the writing of this book flows well, and it’s enjoyable to read. The author’s tone is clear, and each sentence carries interesting information crucial to understanding the book. I have nothing to dislike in the book. The book is professionally edited, as I could only find a few grammar errors in it. So, I’d like to award the book with 4 out of 4 stars.

I recommend this book to lovers of romance novels. Nigerian audiences—specifically, the Yorubas—would resonate well with the setting and tone of the book because that is the culture and place where the story is set. However, any romance novel lover with the ability to read English can still enjoy the book.

° Olomofe is an accomplished author

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